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Duppy Conqueror - The Wailers - Burnin (Vinyl, LP, Album)

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  1. This CD is comprised of 2 LPs: Argo LP (with undocumented piano, bass, drums) and Burnin' (with Barry Harris on piano, William Austin on bass, and Frank Gant, drums). Both from Both dates put Sonny in great form on both alto and tenor. He plays a bunch of blues & rhythm changes on the Argo date -- mostly originals with a few standards/5(86).

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  2. The Wailers' fourth album overall, Burnin', was their second for Island Records, released only six months after its predecessor, Catch a Fire. Given that speed, it's not surprising that several tracks -- "Put It On," "Small Axe," and "Duppy Conqueror" -- are re-recordings of songs dating back a .

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  3. Duppy is patois for ghost, and producer Lee Perry and The Wailers conquered not just evil spirits, but much of the reggae world with this phenomenal number. But first Perry had to overcome his financial problems. He owed The Upsetters money, and understandably they .

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  4. Burnin', an Album by The Wailers. Released in on Island (catalog no. ; CD). Genres: Roots Reggae.

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  5. Duppy Conqueror Lyrics: Yes, me friend / We de a street again / Yes, me friend, me good friend / Them say we free again / The bars could not hold me / Force could not control me, now / They try to.

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  6. Bob Marley & the Wailers - Duppy Conqueror Album: Burnin' () ©Tuff Gong/Island Records (Universal).

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  7. The Wailers' fourth album overall, Burnin', was their second for Island Records, released only six months after its predecessor, Catch a Fire. Given that speed, it's not surprising that several tracks -- "Put It On," "Small Axe," and "Duppy Conqueror" -- are re-recordings of songs dating back a few years.

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  8. Jul 23,  · Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group Duppy Conqueror · The Wailers Burnin' ℗ Island Records, a division of Universal Music Operations Limited Released on: .

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  9. The album Burnin' was released the same year as Bob Marley And The Wailers' Island debut Catch A Fire and launched the reggae anthems “I Shot The Sheriff” and “Get Up, Stand Up.” Eric Clapton’s #1 pop version of “I Shot The Sheriff” gave a major boost to reggae’s acceptance with the general public and to recognition for Marley, who some have called the first Third World superstar.

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